DATA PRIVACY COMPLIANCE (DPC)

CLOUD PRIVACY CHECK (CPC)

"Complexity is your enemy. Any fool can make something complicated. It is hard to make something simple."
Richard Branson

Change Language

CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag

CPC CONFERENCE - VIENNA, 28-30 OCTOBER 2016

Legal Toolbox

Standard

CPC Icon Button

Service Agreement

Data Processing Related

CPC Icon Button

Data Processing Agreement

CPC Icon Button

Cross-Border Measures

CPC Icon Button

Subcontractor Measures

CPC Icon Button

Transparency Notices

CPC Icon Button ×

Service Agreement

A service agreement covering the cloud service is required. In the service agreement, the service obligations of the CSC and the CSP are defined in terms of governing national law. The core of the defined obligation of the CSC is payment of the service fees. The core of the defined obligation of the CSP is the provision of the cloud service. Whether further provisions are included – and what they are – depends on the requirements of the contract parties (e.g. provisions regarding late payment, blocking of the service, the service level, availability, performance, etc.).

Besides the generally required cloud service agreement, the so-called “CPC Legal Toolbox” contains four further instruments:

CPC Icon Button ×

Data Processing Agreement

The data processing agreement is a contract for whose content the governing national law specifies certain requirements. If these requirements are met, the contract defines the specific involvement of a contractor in accordance with data protection law.

Therefore, it is a preferable form for the involvement of contractors.

CPC Icon Button ×

Cross-Border Measures

The “cross-border” package of measures includes guidelines for data-protection-compliant configuration of cross-border data processing. There are various differences to observe depending on which country the data are transferred to.

CPC Icon Button ×

Subcontractor Measures

The “subcontractor” package of measures includes guidelines for the involvement of subcontractors by the CSP. Special requirements apply to these measures due to the data processing agreement as well as due to possible further cross-border data processing.

CPC Icon Button ×

Transparency Notices

Particularly the involvement of subcontractors creates a transparency obligation for the CSP vis-à-vis the CSC. The “transparency notice” tool acknowledges and explains this obligation.

Step 1

In the first stage of the CPC, we check whether the given fact pattern includes any personally identifiable information.

No

If the answer is NO then no data protection related measures are required. The only instrument in place is the service contract between the cloud service provider and the cloud service customer.

Yes

If the answer is YES, the second test of the Cloud Privacy Check must be performed.

Step 2

In the second stage of the CPC, we check whether a third party, involved within the cloud setup, processes personal data or has access to personal data.

No

The technical design of the service, as provided, is crucial. Therefore, a lawyer must analyse and understand the technical setup, i.e. the service design. Within the service design, a point of change can be defined. If the point of change is not exceeded the setup has no specific data protection relevance. Then, the analysis under the CPC can be stopped. The sole instrument in place will be the service agreement between the cloud service customer and the cloud service provider.

Yes

If the delineation marked by the point of change has been exceeded further controls will need to be implemented. In particular, a data processing agreement must be entered into.This is in addition to the service agreement. After the second stage, the third and the fourth tests must be performed.

Step 3

In stage three of the CPC, we check whether data leaves the home jurisdiction of the cloud service customer.

No

If the answer is NO, then no data protection instrument is required under this test and the analysis can proceed to the fourth test.

Yes

If the answer is YES then the crossborder „package“ must be activated. This package involves some paperwork (the EU model agreement with the cloud service provider, activation of the Safe Harbor regime and respective notifications to authorities, if required). Afterwards the fourth step is to be performed.

Step 4

In the fourth test, we consider whether the cloud provider uses subcontractors.

No

If the answer is NO, then the cloud privacy check can be completed and no additional instrument needs to be deployed.

Yes

If the answer is YES the set of measures we refer to as the „subcontractor package“ must be implemented.

This package requires the cloud service provider to impose the obligations it has, in regards to the cloud service customer, onto the subcontractor. In addition, the cloud service customer should be informed of the fact that subcontractors are involved and where they operate. The action item in question here is „Notification to the Cloud Service Customer”. The purpose of this measure is to increase transparency.

Contributors

UK submission contributed by Emily Jones, Osborne Clarke (country report) and Daniel Tozer and Alex Hardy, Harbottle & Lewis (infographic)

Emily Jones
Osborne Clarke LLP
+44 (0)117 917 3652
emily.jones@osborneclarke.com

Daniel Tozer
Harbottle & Lewis LLP
020 7667 5000
daniel.tozer@harbottle.com

Alex Hardy

Explore

The menu options below allow you to obtain a copy of the Cloud Privacy infographic (CPC) as well as the Data Privacy Compliance (DPC) report for each country. Additionally, you may browse through the Data Privacy Compliance topics or compare two countries by topic to locate minor differences that you may want to be aware of.

Country Infographic

Get the Cloud Privacy Check (CPC) infographic for each country represented in this project.

Country Report

Get the Data Privacy Compliance (DPC) report for each country represented in this project.

Topic Report

Save time and browse only one specific topic across multiple Data Privacy Compliance reports. Available for each country represented.

Compare Countries

An easy means of comparing a Data Privacy topic between two countries. Provides an excellent way to visualize the small but important differences between countries.

CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag
CPC Country Flag

Country Report (preview)

UNITED KINGDOM – Data Protection Regime Relevant for Cloud Computing Issues
Contributor(s): Emily Jones

I. Applicability of National Data Protection Law

[Terminology] In the United Kingdom, the DPA-UK is called the “Data Protection Act 1998”. An online retrievable legal text for the...

Austria

Das DSG-AT schützt auch juristische Personen in Bezug auf die sie beschreibende Information. Für die Frage, ob in pseudonymisierten Daten oder verschlüsselten Daten ein Personenbezug erkennbar bleibt, kommt es auf den Horizont des Empfängers an.

Austria

Das DSG-AT schützt auch juristische Personen in Bezug auf die sie beschreibende Information. Für die Frage, ob in pseudonymisierten Daten oder verschlüsselten Daten ein Personenbezug erkennbar bleibt, kommt es auf den Horizont des Empfängers an.

Grenzüberschreitender Datentransfer

Im Cross-Border Transfer über IT-Schengen hinaus ist der CSP unabhängig vom CSC befugt, eine Genehmigung bei der DSB-AT zu beantragen, wenn er einen bestimmten weiteren Subdienstleister aus dem Ausland heranziehen will.

Einbindung von Subunternehmern

Der CSP darf Subdienstleister nur mit Billigung des CSC einsetzen. Dies bedingt, dass der CSP den CSC vor dem Beizug von Subdienstleistern informiert haben muss. Auf Anfrage muss der CSC dem CDS den Namen von beigezogenen Subunternehmern bekannt geben. Der CSC hat ein Vetorecht gegen den Beizug von Subdienstleistern.

Country Report (preview)

AUSTRIA – Data Protection Regime Relevant for Cloud Computing Issues
Contributor: Prof. Clemens Thiele

I. Applicability of National Data Protection Law

[Terminology] In Austria, the national data protection act ("DPA-AT") is called “Datenschutzgesetz 2000 (Federal Data Protection Act...

Country Report (preview)

BELGIUM – Data Protection Regime Relevant for Cloud Computing Issues
Contributor(s):

I. Applicability of National Data Protection Law

[Terminology] In Belgium, the national data protection act (hereinafter: DPA-BE) is called the Act of 8 December 1992 on the Protection of Privacy in...

Country Report (preview)

BULGARIA – Data Protection Regime Relevant for Cloud Computing Issues
Contributor(s): Mitko Karushkov

I. Applicability of National Data Protection Law

[Terminology] In Bulgaria, the national data protection act ("DPA-BG") is called “Law for Protection of Personal Data”. An online...

Switzerland

Das DSG-CH schützt auch juristische Personen in Bezug auf die sie beschreibende Information.
Das DSG-CH kennt die Kategorie der Persönlichkeitsprofile. Ein Persönlichkeitsprofil ist eine Zusammenstellung von Daten, die eine Beurteilung wesentlicher Aspekte der Persönlichkeit einer natürlichen Person erlaubt. Persönlichkeitsprofile sind den besonders schützenswerten Informationen (Sensiblen Personendaten) gleichgestellt. Der DBS-CH behandelt pseudonymisierte Daten als Personendaten. Die Rechtsfolgen richten sich nach einem "risikobasierten Ansatz". Der DSB-CH hat sich gegen die Beurteilung allein aus Empfängersicht ausgesprochen.

Switzerland

Das DSG-CH schützt auch juristische Personen in Bezug auf die sie beschreibende Information.
Das DSG-CH kennt die Kategorie der Persönlichkeitsprofile. Ein Persönlichkeitsprofil ist eine Zusammenstellung von Daten, die eine Beurteilung wesentlicher Aspekte der Persönlichkeit einer natürlichen Person erlaubt. Persönlichkeitsprofile sind den besonders schützenswerten Informationen (Sensiblen Personendaten) gleichgestellt. Der DBS-CH behandelt pseudonymisierte Daten als Personendaten. Die Rechtsfolgen richten sich nach einem "risikobasierten Ansatz". Der DSB-CH hat sich gegen die Beurteilung allein aus Empfängersicht ausgesprochen.

Grenzüberschreitender Datentransfer

Grenzüberschreitender Datentransfer, der über genehmigte Mustervertragsklauseln oder über Binding Corporate Rules gerechtfertigt wird, ist zu melden.

Einbindung von Subunternehmern

Es gibt keine ausdrückliche Pflicht, beigezogene Subunternehmer namentlich zu nennen. Allerdings kann sich eine solche Pflicht im Einzelfall aus den Umständen ergeben (Angemessenheitsprüfung).

Country Report (preview)

Differential report missing

Country Report (preview)

CZECH REPUBLIC – Data Protection Regime Relevant for Cloud Computing Issues
Contributor(s): Tomáš Nielsen, Ivana Nemčeková

I. Applicability of National Data Protection Law

[Terminology] In the Czech Republic, the national data protection act ("DPA-CZ") is called “Act No. 101/2000 Coll.,...

Germany

Das DSG-DE schützt nur natürliche Personen in Bezug auf die sie beschreibende Information. Juristische Personen sind grundsätzlich nicht geschützt. Eine Ausnahme enthalten die Datenschutzbestimmungen den deutschen Telekommunikationsgesetzes (TKG). Die Datenschutzbestimmungen des TKG gelten auch für juristische Personen, soweit es um Verkehrsdaten geht.

Das Datenschutzrecht findet auch auf pseudonymisierte Daten anwendbar. Allein auf anyonimiserte Daten findet das Datenschutzrecht nicht mehr Anwendung. Die deutschen Datenschutzaufsichtsbehörden haben den Standpunkt eingenommen, dass das Datenschutzrecht auch dann bei der Nutzung eines Cloud Services zu beachten ist, wenn die in die Cloud ausgelagerten Daten, so verschlüsselt sind, dass der CSP sie nicht der jeweiligen Person zuordnen kann. Dieser Ansatz ist aufgrund seiner Begründung jedoch umstritten.

Für sog. besondere personenbezogene Daten gilt eine Spezialregelung. Nach dieser scheidet eine Verarbeitung solcher Daten in der Cloud außerhalb einer Auftragsdatenverarbeitung in der EU bzw. des EWR aus (zulässig selbstverständlich bei Vorliegen einer Einwilligung des CDS). Solche besondere personenbezogene Daten sind Angaben über die rassische und ethnische Herkunft, politische Meinungen, religiöse oder philosophische Überzeugungen, Gewerkschaftszugehörigkeit, Gesundheit oder Sexualleben.

Einbindung von Dritten

Ein Dienstleister, der vom CSC als Auftragsdatenverarbeiter im Sinne des DSG-DE beauftragt wird, gilt nicht als Dritter im Sinne des DSG-DE. Das DSG-DE setzt für die Privilegierungswirkung jedoch – vereinfacht – die folgenden Eckpunkte voraus:

  • Sorgfältige Auswahl des CSP durch den CSC 
  • Regelmäßige Prüfung des CSP durch den CSC in Bezug auf IT-Sicherheit 
  • Weisungsgebundenheit des CSP gegenüber dem CSC 
  • Vertrag über die Auftragsdatenverarbeitung nach den Vorgaben des DSG-DE 
  • Schriftform des Vertrags über die Auftragsdatenverarbeitung 


Für alle Länder, die nicht zur EU oder dem EWR gehören, gilt die Privilegierung nicht. Dabei bleibt es selbst dann, wenn für diese Länder durch die EU-Kommission ein angemessenes Datenschutzniveau anerkannt worden ist. Das hat folgende praktische Konsequenz für die Zulässigkeitsbewertung der Einbeziehung eines Dritten:

  • innerhalb der EU/des EWR: eine inhaltlich und formell korrekt aufgesetzte Vereinbarung über die Auftragsdatenverarbeitung macht den Einbezug des Dritten zulässig. 
  • außerhalb der EU/des EWR: Die datenschutzrechtliche Zulässigkeit ist anhand einer Interessenabwägung zu bewerten. Die Existenz der formell und inhaltlich korrekt zu Stande gekommenen Vereinbarung über die Auftragsdatenverarbeitung wirkt sich positiv aus auf die Interessenabwägung und damit auf die Zulässigkeit der Einbeziehung des Dritten. 


Bei grenzüberschreitendem Datentransfer sind weitere Anforderungen zu beachten (hierzu nachfolgend Ziffer 4). Jedenfalls auf Nachfrage muss der CSC dem CDS den Namen des Dienstleisters und auch den Ort der Datenverarbeitung bekannt geben.

Es ist durch den CSC gegenüber dem CSP vertraglich die Herausgabe- oder physische Löschungsverpflichtung des CSP für die im Auftrag des CSC verarbeiteten Daten nach Beendigung des Auftragsdatenverhältnisses zu regeln.

Grenzüberschreitender Datentransfer

Bei Nutzung eines Cloud-Services in einem Drittstaat bzw. einem Zugriff auf personenbezogene Daten aus einem Drittstaat sind weitere Maßnahmen zum Schutz der personenbezogenen Daten zu ergreifen. Dies sind die Instrumente (z.B. EU-Standardvertrag, durch die Aufsichtsbehörden genehmigter Individualvertrag), die auch in den anderen EU-Mitgliedsstaaten vorgesehen sind. Als deutsche Besonderheit kommen zwei Aspekte hinzu:

Bei der Verwendung EU-Standardverträgen besteht keine Anzeigepflicht und kein Genehmigungserfordernis. Allein individuell gestaltete Verträge müssen den Aufsichtsbehörden zur Genehmigung vorgelegt werden, damit sie datenschutzrechtlich rechtfertigende Wirkung haben. Für Binding Corporate Rules bestehen Sonderregelungen.

Nach Ansicht der deutschen Datenschutzaufsichtsbehörden in der Orientierungshilfe müssen in jedem Fall ergänzend zu den vorstehenden Gestaltungen Vereinbarungen nach den inhaltlichen Maßgaben der Vereinbarung über die Auftragsdatenverarbeitung getroffen werden.

Einbindung von Subunternehmern

Der Subunternehmer muss in jedem Fall vertraglich durch den CSP eingebunden werden und gegenüber dem CSC transparent gemacht werden. Der CSC muss auch eine Möglichkeit haben, die Einbindung von weiteren Subunternehmern zu „steuern“; er muss zumindest die Möglichkeit haben, der Einbeziehung von Subunternehmen zu widersprechen. Hierzu müssen ihm die Subunternehmer so rechtzeitig benannt werden, dass er deren Einbindung effektiv widersprechen kann.

Die Vereinbarung muss auch dem CSC die Rechte gegenüber dem Subunternehmer einräumen, welche der CSC gegenüber dem CSP hat.

Country Report (preview)

GERMANY – Data Protection Regime Relevant for Cloud Computing Issues
Contributor(s): Dr. Jens Eckhardt

I. Applicability of National Data Protection Law

[Terminology] In Germany, the national data protection act ("DPA-DE") is called “Bundesdatenschutzgesetz (BDSG)”. An online retrievable...

Country Report (preview)

DENMARK – Data Protection Regime Relevant for Cloud Computing Issues
Contributor(s): NJORD Law Fim

I. Applicability of National Data Protection Law

[Terminology] In Denmark, the national data protection act ("DPA-DK") is called “persondataloven”. An online retrievable legal text for the...

Country Report (preview)

ESTONIA – Data Protection Regime Relevant for Cloud Computing Issues
Contributor(s): Mari-Liis Orav

I. Applicability of National Data Protection Law

[Terminology] In Estonia, the national data protection act ("DPA-EE") is called “Isikuandmete kaitse seadus”. An online retrievable legal...

Country Report (preview)

SPAIN – Data Protection Regime Relevant for Cloud Computing Issues
Contributor(s): Miguel Recio

I. Applicability of National Data Protection Law

[Terminology] In Spain, the national data protection act ("DPA-ES") is called “ABC”. An online retrievable legal text for the DPA-ES in English...

Country Report (preview)

FINLAND – Data Protection Regime Relevant for Cloud Computing Issues
Contributor(s): Erkko Korhonen, Hannes Snellman Attorneys Ltd.

I. Applicability of National Data Protection Law

[Terminology] In Finland, the national data protection act ("DPA-FI") is called “Personal Data Act...

Country Report (preview)

FRANCE – Data Protection Regime Relevant for Cloud Computing Issues
Contributor(s): Me Eric Le Quellenec, Directeur du département Informatique conseil, Cabinet Alain Bensoussan Selas

I. Applicability of National Data Protection Law

[Terminology] In France, the national data protection...

Country Report (preview)

GREECE – Data Protection Regime Relevant for Cloud Computing Issues
Contributor(s): Takis Kakouris & Mary Deligianni, Zepos & Yannopoulos

I. Applicability of National Data Protection Law

[Terminology] In Greece, the national data protection act ("DPA-GR") is Law 2472/1997. An online...

Country Report (preview)

Differential report missing

Country Report (preview)

HUNGARIA – Data Protection Regime Relevant for Cloud Computing Issues
Contributor(s): Nelly Kocsomba

I. Applicability of National Data Protection Law

[Terminology] In Hungary, the national data protection act ("DPA-HU") is called Act CXII of 2011 on the Right of Informational...

Country Report (preview)

Differential report missing

Country Report (preview)

ITALY – Data Protection Regime Relevant for Cloud Computing Issues
Contributor(s):

I. Applicability of National Data Protection Law

[Terminology] In Italy, the national data protection act ("DPA-IT") is called “Codice in materia di Protezione dei Dati Personali”. An online retrievable...

Country Report (preview)

LITHUANIA – Data Protection Regime Relevant for Cloud Computing Issues
Contributor(s): Andrius Iškauskas

I. Applicability of National Data Protection Law

[Terminology] In Lithuania, the national data protection act ("DPA-LT") is called Republic of Lithuania law on legal protection of...

Country Report (preview)

LUXEMBOURG – Data Protection Regime Relevant for Cloud Computing Issues
Contributor(s): Me Roy REDING

I. Applicability of National Data Protection Law

[Terminology] In Luxembourg, the national data protection act ("DPA-LU") is called “Loi modifiée du 2 août 2002 relative à la protection...

Country Report (preview)

LATVIA – Data Protection Regime Relevant for Cloud Computing Issues
Contributor(s): Dmitrijs Nikolajenko

I. Applicability of National Data Protection Law

[Terminology] In Latvia, the national data protection act ("DPA-LV") is called Datu Valsts Inspekcija (Data State Inspectorate). An...

Country Report (preview)

MONACO – Data Protection Regime Relevant for Cloud Computing Issues
Contributor(s): GIACCARDI, Thomas

I. Applicability of National Data Protection Law

[Terminology] In Monaco, the national data protection act ("DPA-MC") is called “Loi relative à la protection des informations...

Country Report (partial)

REPUBLIC OF MACEDONIA – Data Protection Regime Relevant for Cloud Computing Issues
Contributor(s): Valentin Fetadzokoski

I. Applicability of National Data Protection Law

[Terminology] In Republic of Macedonia, the national data protection act ("DPA-MK") is called “Law on Personal Data...

Country Report (preview)

MALTA – Data Protection Regime Relevant for Cloud Computing Issues
Contributor(s): Dr. Gege Gatt, Dr. Antonio Ghio, Dr. Thomas Bugeja

I. Applicability of National Data Protection Law

[Terminology] In Malta, the national data protection act ("DPA-MT") is called “Data Protection Act"...

Country Report (preview)

THE NETHERLANDS – Data Protection Regime Relevant for Cloud Computing Issues
Contributor(s): I.M. Tempelman

I. Applicability of National Data Protection Law

[Terminology] In the Netherlands, the national data protection act ("DPA-NL") is called “Wbp”. An online retrievable legal text for...

Country Report (preview)

NORWAY – Data Protection Regime Relevant for Cloud Computing Issues
Contributor(s): Øystein Flagstad

I. Applicability of National Data Protection Law

[Terminology] In Norway, the national data protection act ("DPA-NO") is called "Personopplysningsloven". The DPA-NO has a number of...

Country Report (preview)

POLAND – Data Protection Regime Relevant for Cloud Computing Issues
Contributor(s):

I. Applicability of National Data Protection Law

[Terminology] In Poland, the national data protection act ("DPA-PL") is called “GIODO”. An online retrievable legal text for the DPA-PL in English can be...

Country Report (preview)

PORTUGAL – Data Protection Regime Relevant for Cloud Computing Issues
Contributor(s): Ricardo Henriques

I. Applicability of National Data Protection Law

[Terminology] In Portugal, the national data protection act ("DPA-PT") is called “Lei n.o 67/98 de 26 de Outubro - Lei da Proteção de...

Country Report (preview)

ROMANIA – Data Protection Regime Relevant for Cloud Computing Issues
Contributor(s): Alexandru Campean, Andreea Alexandru

I. Applicability of National Data Protection Law

[Terminology] In Romania, the national data protection act ("DPA-RO") is called “Law no. 677/2001 on the protection...

Country Report (preview)

REPUBLIC OF SERBIA – Data Protection Regime Relevant for Cloud Computing Issues
Contributor(s): Labud Raznatovic

I. Applicability of National Data Protection Law

[Terminology] In Serbia, data protection is regulated by the ("DPA-RS") is called “Zakon o zaštiti podataka o ličnosti / Law...

Country Report (preview)

SWEDEN – Data Protection Regime Relevant for Cloud Computing Issues
Contributor(s):

I. Applicability of National Data Protection Law

[Terminology] In Sweden, the national data protection act ("DPA-SE") is called “ABC”. An online retrievable legal text for the DPA-SE in English can be...

Country Report (preview)

SLOVAKIA – Data Protection Regime Relevant for Cloud Computing Issues
Contributor(s):

I. Applicability of National Data Protection Law

[Terminology] In Slovakia, the national data protection act ("DPA-SK") is called “Zákon č. 122/2013 Z.z. o ochrane osobných údajov a o zmene a doplnení...

Country Report (preview)

TURKEY – Data Protection Regime Relevant for Cloud Computing Issues
Contributor(s): Begüm Okumus - Bensu Aydın

I. Applicability of National Data Protection Law

[Terminology] In Turkey, there is no national data protection law in force for the time being but there is a Draft Law which is...

BROCHURE - CLOUD PRIVACY CHECK

Requirements under Data Protection Law that a Cloud Service Customer must ensure when moving into a cloud environment.

Languages available: English & German

GET PUBLICATION

WHITEPAPER - CLOUD & DATA PROTECTION

Cloud Computing Guideline

Languages available: English & German

GET PUBLICATION